shitty yaoi fucker.
Old pictures

tchaikogret:

This is Barack Obama in his basket team

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Arnold Schwarzenegger discovering New York for the first time

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Filming the roaring lion for Metro Goldwyn Mayer

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Elijah Wood and Macaulay Culkin image

Les Beatles and Muhammad Ali

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 Chuck Norris and Bruce Lee

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 Marilyn Monroe meeting Elisabeth II

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Stephen Hawking and his wife, Jane

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Steven Spielberg in his mecanic shark for the movie “Jaws”

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Robin Williams as a cheerleader

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Behind the scene of Star Wars

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latingeek:

here’s some junk i’ve been up to recently

spicybuttholeclub:

shuckl:

oh no……………

THIS IS NOT A DOG IT IS A FURRY!

spicybuttholeclub:

shuckl:

oh no……………

THIS IS NOT A DOG IT IS A FURRY!

pretoriaanikyborgi:

Goliaths on Borderlands 2 still tend to scare me.

pretoriaanikyborgi:

Goliaths on Borderlands 2 still tend to scare me.

diobrandosdong:

diobrandosdong:

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Hey there Vigilance, you’re the new Danny. Welcome aboard.

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DIOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Gabriel Perez by Jimmy Backius.

borlax:

I have watched this at least 15 times since I reblogged this several hours ago

here’s some junk i’ve been up to recently

rooshoes:

survivingthetriwizardtournament:

sixthrock:

lavastormsw:

bolinsboo:

razzledazzy:


The photo above is the closest humanity has ever come to creating Medusa. 
If you were to look at this, you would die instantly. End of story.
The image is of a reactor core lava formation in the basement of the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It’s called the Elephant’s Foot and weighs hundreds of tons, but is only a couple meters across.
Oh, and regarding the Medusa thing? This picture was taken through a mirror around the corner of the hallway. Because the wheeled camera they sent up to take pictures of it was destroyed by the radiation. 

I wonder if they could get pictures in colour now or maybe get an accurate heat reading off of that thing, if it’s still all there.

It’s crazy to think that something can be that strong that it would kill you by just looking at it. Though it’s understandable. I’d like a heat reading off of it.

Oh my god
I have such a science boner right now
Do you know how fucking dense that must be to weigh hundreds of tons?
Pretty fucking dense.
Wow.
I found this video for anyone who wants to see a video of the thing (although it’s not the best quality). This thing is a serious monster. I have a little trouble deciphering this Wikipedia article, but from what I gather, this thing weighs 1,200 tons (2,400,000 pounds - a number I cannot even begin to fathom) and is only losing about 22 pounds of uranium per year. It resists its environment and if the shelter is improved, that loss is expected to drop.
Holy shit.
I am simply astounded by the sheer power and properties of radiation and nuclear power plants. This is seriously scary stuff. Not to mention its effects on humans. i find deformed humans very, very unnerving. The mutations that radiation cause are the worst, in my opinion, than say, genetic mutations. This video shows some of the mutations from the Chernobyl meltdown (warning: these are very disturbing images, so view at your own risk).
Here’s another website with a collection of Chernobyl pictures, mostly of the building itself (no mutation pictures, so unless you’re upset by major destruction, this is a really cool look-through). This is my favorite picture because it really shows the dripping of the radioactive fuel/debris lava out of the valve. I just find it so absolutely terrifying that something like this could ever happen. Radiation is seriously scary stuff. What I want to know is how they took that picture.
Oh holy shit this is terrifying. The color just makes it worse. It’s like a volcano erupted indoors. Which is probably a pretty accurate analogy, plus tons of radiation to go with it. “”Corium” is only formed during a reactor meltdown as a product of the solid fuel fissioning uncontrollably. This super-hot fuel turns into a liquid and melts its way through steel, concrete, and whatever else that might be in contact with it. So it’s a mixture of fuel and various building materials,” the admin says in the comments.
This article says that Chernobyl will stay radioactive for 100,000 years.
Radiation is just unfathomably scary stuff.

Daaaaamn.
All of this is just so incredibly terrifying and amazing at the same time. Just to think of the things humans are capable of now, and all the various horrible ways everything could go very very wrong if we’re too careless for just a second…
okay yeah fine I didn’t need to sleep tonight anyway ;_;

John this is for you.
My favorite new term is science boner.

I’ve spent many long nights researching Chernobyl until dawn breaks because its so utterly fascinating to me, having been born exactly 3 years to the day after the disaster, and growing up in a resulting decade of Nuclear Energy Concern.  The photo on this post is one of my absolute favorites.
Thing is, Chernobyl is not as scary as it was, or as it appears above.  Yes, corium is pretty harrowing stuff but it will be content to simply sit there and thaw for the next 100 years until it is (relatively) cool; it’s simply a matter of building a suitable shelter to keep it away from water and debris.  And yes, Chernobyl will still be “radioactive” for centuries but not in a way that adversely affects a species’ ability to live on that land.  The most detrimental radioactive isotopes scattered during the explosion have fizzled out with relatively short half-lives of only a decade or so.  Numerous scientists have set up on the property to perform nuclear research since there’s little concern about accidentally irradiating an area like the Chernobyl exclusion zone.  The grounds are occupied 24/7 by rotating skeleton crews that know where all the “hot spots” are, most a result of the Russian military’s clumsy cleanup efforts digging fields of mass graves for irradiated metal objects, believing out of sight meant out of mind.  Many of the Chernobyl workers stay for an entire season, months on end, and return each year.  Some of them even farm on the land.  The macabre visage of the crumbling iron sarcophagus is often times more fearsome than the effect its mutant microwave mummy has had on the city.
In actuality, the Chernobyl exclusion zone is one of the most rapidly-growing and healthy wildlife ecosystems in Europe.  Whatever radioactivity is left in the water, grass and plant fauna doesn’t appear to be negatively affecting wildlife populations—in fact everything that lives there is thriving now that humans have left.  You could honestly call it a wildlife preserve.
Think about that: the nuclear fallout that will foul the soil of two square kilometers for hundreds of years is actually less destructive to nature than our own species.

rooshoes:

survivingthetriwizardtournament:

sixthrock:

lavastormsw:

bolinsboo:

razzledazzy:

The photo above is the closest humanity has ever come to creating Medusa. 

If you were to look at this, you would die instantly. End of story.

The image is of a reactor core lava formation in the basement of the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It’s called the Elephant’s Foot and weighs hundreds of tons, but is only a couple meters across.

Oh, and regarding the Medusa thing? This picture was taken through a mirror around the corner of the hallway. Because the wheeled camera they sent up to take pictures of it was destroyed by the radiation

I wonder if they could get pictures in colour now or maybe get an accurate heat reading off of that thing, if it’s still all there.

It’s crazy to think that something can be that strong that it would kill you by just looking at it. Though it’s understandable. I’d like a heat reading off of it.

Oh my god

I have such a science boner right now

Do you know how fucking dense that must be to weigh hundreds of tons?

Pretty fucking dense.

Wow.

I found this video for anyone who wants to see a video of the thing (although it’s not the best quality). This thing is a serious monster. I have a little trouble deciphering this Wikipedia article, but from what I gather, this thing weighs 1,200 tons (2,400,000 pounds - a number I cannot even begin to fathom) and is only losing about 22 pounds of uranium per year. It resists its environment and if the shelter is improved, that loss is expected to drop.

Holy shit.

I am simply astounded by the sheer power and properties of radiation and nuclear power plants. This is seriously scary stuff. Not to mention its effects on humans. i find deformed humans very, very unnerving. The mutations that radiation cause are the worst, in my opinion, than say, genetic mutations. This video shows some of the mutations from the Chernobyl meltdown (warning: these are very disturbing images, so view at your own risk).

Here’s another website with a collection of Chernobyl pictures, mostly of the building itself (no mutation pictures, so unless you’re upset by major destruction, this is a really cool look-through). This is my favorite picture because it really shows the dripping of the radioactive fuel/debris lava out of the valve. I just find it so absolutely terrifying that something like this could ever happen. Radiation is seriously scary stuff. What I want to know is how they took that picture.

Oh holy shit this is terrifying. The color just makes it worse. It’s like a volcano erupted indoors. Which is probably a pretty accurate analogy, plus tons of radiation to go with it. “”Corium” is only formed during a reactor meltdown as a product of the solid fuel fissioning uncontrollably. This super-hot fuel turns into a liquid and melts its way through steel, concrete, and whatever else that might be in contact with it. So it’s a mixture of fuel and various building materials,” the admin says in the comments.

This article says that Chernobyl will stay radioactive for 100,000 years.

Radiation is just unfathomably scary stuff.

Daaaaamn.

All of this is just so incredibly terrifying and amazing at the same time. Just to think of the things humans are capable of now, and all the various horrible ways everything could go very very wrong if we’re too careless for just a second…

okay yeah fine I didn’t need to sleep tonight anyway ;_;

John this is for you.

My favorite new term is science boner.

I’ve spent many long nights researching Chernobyl until dawn breaks because its so utterly fascinating to me, having been born exactly 3 years to the day after the disaster, and growing up in a resulting decade of Nuclear Energy Concern.  The photo on this post is one of my absolute favorites.

Thing is, Chernobyl is not as scary as it was, or as it appears above.  Yes, corium is pretty harrowing stuff but it will be content to simply sit there and thaw for the next 100 years until it is (relatively) cool; it’s simply a matter of building a suitable shelter to keep it away from water and debris.  And yes, Chernobyl will still be “radioactive” for centuries but not in a way that adversely affects a species’ ability to live on that land.  The most detrimental radioactive isotopes scattered during the explosion have fizzled out with relatively short half-lives of only a decade or so.  Numerous scientists have set up on the property to perform nuclear research since there’s little concern about accidentally irradiating an area like the Chernobyl exclusion zone.  The grounds are occupied 24/7 by rotating skeleton crews that know where all the “hot spots” are, most a result of the Russian military’s clumsy cleanup efforts digging fields of mass graves for irradiated metal objects, believing out of sight meant out of mind.  Many of the Chernobyl workers stay for an entire season, months on end, and return each year.  Some of them even farm on the land.  The macabre visage of the crumbling iron sarcophagus is often times more fearsome than the effect its mutant microwave mummy has had on the city.

In actuality, the Chernobyl exclusion zone is one of the most rapidly-growing and healthy wildlife ecosystems in Europe.  Whatever radioactivity is left in the water, grass and plant fauna doesn’t appear to be negatively affecting wildlife populations—in fact everything that lives there is thriving now that humans have left.  You could honestly call it a wildlife preserve.

Think about that: the nuclear fallout that will foul the soil of two square kilometers for hundreds of years is actually less destructive to nature than our own species.

meenat:

I’m in love with indigenous characters so I’m gonna draw my fave ones and the first one is the fab Kuzco psshhh who doesn’t love Kuzco!? 

nekohooch:

the homestuck fandom

nekohooch:

the homestuck fandom